P&G Hosts Massive “Everyday Effect” Giveaway in NYC

This month, Procter and Gamble decided to take over the biggest media city in the world – New York – in what they call “the largest consumer event in the company’s 175 year history”.  NYC was blitzed on June 19th by 25 brands as part of P&G’s “Everyday Effect” campaign.

P&G Hosts Massive “Everyday Effect” Giveaway in NYC

Throughout the city, more than 40,000 products were distributed at strategically timed moments. For example, free Scope mouthwash samples were offered to coffee drinkers, Febreze car vent clips to taxi drivers, and Iams dog treats to people walking their dogs.

Activities included free barber, salon, make-up and nail services and free pedicab rides. P&G’s New York saturation campaign reached far beyond the city, and was also supported by a dedicated website, Facebook and Twitter.

The campaign added value to the lives of New Yorkers and at the same time demonstrated how P&G’s brands improve everyday life in small yet meaningful ways.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just interrupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

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Nike projects laser-beam Football pitches on to City streets

Finding somewhere to kick a ball around in the city can be a challenge – which is why Nike decided to make things easier for soccer players around the world using a laser-projected pitch.

Using an app, soccer players with nowhere to play in the city in question can request a visit from the company’s laser-equipped van. The van’s crane is then raised above an open area, and the digital soccer field is projected onto the urban landscape.

Nike Laser Football

A pair of small nets are then unloaded to complete the venue, turning an initially barren urban area into a lively game of soccer. Not only is the idea fun, but it gives kids and teenagers without access to the right facilities a chance to hone their skills wherever they can find the space to play.

This is also a great example of a brand offering genuine value to consumer in line with its “Play” brand promise, and  generating positive word of mouth.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

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Jeep offers free GPS App to help drivers “Get Lost”

The Jeep is an iconic automobile. Freedom, discovery and adventure are just a few of the keywords that marketers seek to associate with the brand.

Jeep Get Lost

The marque is very popular in Argentina, but ironically most of the 4×4 vehicles never cross the city limits, and Jeep drivers rarely experience any kind of freedom, discovery or adventure – in their cars at least.

To help out Argentinians lacking the inspiration to get out of town, Jeep has created a free-to-download GPS add-on app that will get you “God knows where”, to discover 28 lost off-road spots in the country. Just push the button and start following the instructions.

On the one hand, this is a great brand utility initiative, that reaches out to existing customers – in itself quite rare, in a sector obsessed with acquisition.  On the other it really “walks (or drives) the talk” of the brand communication and delivers a strong reinforcement of what the Jeep stands for.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

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IBM creates Ads with a Purpose to promote Smarter Cities

By 2050, it is anticipated that a full 75% of the world’s population will be living in cities. To this end, technology company IBM is investing heavily in systems and algorithms to help city leaders make urban areas function more effectively.

IBM Smarter Cities

Central to this is the belief that city planning and design should have its citizens in mind. The Smarter Cities project aims to encourage ‘smarter thinking’ by involving the people who live in the cities in question.

Rather than just creating the usual suite of interruptive advertising units, IBM launched a series of outdoor installations that also function as useful surfaces people can sit on, take cover under or push their stroller over – a perfect way of demonstrating the brand’s purpose.

The ads also encourage people to share their ideas on how they can improve their neighborhood, by signing up to a virtual community and sharing ideas, photos and video.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

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