Jay-Z’s new album given away free to 1 million Samsung owners

On July 4th, Jay-Z’s new album Magna Carta Holy Grail was made available for download for free and in advance to one million Samsung owners, through an official Samsung-created app. Samsung paid $5 for each download.

Jay-Z’s new album given away free to 1 million Samsung owners

Galaxy S3, Galaxy Note 2 and Galaxy S4 owners were able to download the app and sign in through Twitter or Facebook. The album could then be played either through the app or downloaded in MP3 format directly to hard drives.

The album’s official release date was July 8th, giving a four day window of exclusivity to Samsung owners.

The effort, of course, generated massive buzz and was generally agreed to be a great concept. That said, there was also a great deal of criticism, about the poor functionality of the app, and accusations of spyware … which goes to show that without great execution even the best ideas can be compromised.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just interrupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

For the same budget and energy expended on traditional advertising, many brands are instead creating things that are more tangible, useful and reusable, and that play a more integral part in the consumer’s life.

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P&G Hosts Massive “Everyday Effect” Giveaway in NYC

This month, Procter and Gamble decided to take over the biggest media city in the world – New York – in what they call “the largest consumer event in the company’s 175 year history”.  NYC was blitzed on June 19th by 25 brands as part of P&G’s “Everyday Effect” campaign.

P&G Hosts Massive “Everyday Effect” Giveaway in NYC

Throughout the city, more than 40,000 products were distributed at strategically timed moments. For example, free Scope mouthwash samples were offered to coffee drinkers, Febreze car vent clips to taxi drivers, and Iams dog treats to people walking their dogs.

Activities included free barber, salon, make-up and nail services and free pedicab rides. P&G’s New York saturation campaign reached far beyond the city, and was also supported by a dedicated website, Facebook and Twitter.

The campaign added value to the lives of New Yorkers and at the same time demonstrated how P&G’s brands improve everyday life in small yet meaningful ways.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just interrupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

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Nike projects laser-beam Football pitches on to City streets

Finding somewhere to kick a ball around in the city can be a challenge – which is why Nike decided to make things easier for soccer players around the world using a laser-projected pitch.

Using an app, soccer players with nowhere to play in the city in question can request a visit from the company’s laser-equipped van. The van’s crane is then raised above an open area, and the digital soccer field is projected onto the urban landscape.

Nike Laser Football

A pair of small nets are then unloaded to complete the venue, turning an initially barren urban area into a lively game of soccer. Not only is the idea fun, but it gives kids and teenagers without access to the right facilities a chance to hone their skills wherever they can find the space to play.

This is also a great example of a brand offering genuine value to consumer in line with its “Play” brand promise, and  generating positive word of mouth.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

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IBM creates Ads with a Purpose to promote Smarter Cities

By 2050, it is anticipated that a full 75% of the world’s population will be living in cities. To this end, technology company IBM is investing heavily in systems and algorithms to help city leaders make urban areas function more effectively.

IBM Smarter Cities

Central to this is the belief that city planning and design should have its citizens in mind. The Smarter Cities project aims to encourage ‘smarter thinking’ by involving the people who live in the cities in question.

Rather than just creating the usual suite of interruptive advertising units, IBM launched a series of outdoor installations that also function as useful surfaces people can sit on, take cover under or push their stroller over – a perfect way of demonstrating the brand’s purpose.

The ads also encourage people to share their ideas on how they can improve their neighborhood, by signing up to a virtual community and sharing ideas, photos and video.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

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Pepsi Vending Machine accepts Likes instead of Cash

A typical sampling  effort usually involves street teams in branded outfits handing out free samples. To move beyond the traditional, Pepsi Belgium created ‘The Like Machine’, a vending machine that would dispense free Pepsi in exchange for a ‘like’ on Facebook.

People with smartphones simply have to like the Pepsi Facebook page to receive their free drink: the vending machine uses the phone’s location settings to make sure that only those in the vicinity receive a free sample for their ‘like’.

Those without smartphones can use the 42” built-in touchscreen to log into Facebook to receive a free drink. Once the sample was given, a timer ensured  everyone was logged out of their accounts.

This provides real-time feedback on who has liked, tasted and enjoyed the beverage, as well as building buzz and incentivizing sharing.

VIRTUAL TO ACTUAL

With the growth of always-on ubiquitous internet access, and digitization – our actual and virtual lives are blending in to one.

ALTERNATE BRAND CURRENCIES

Increasingly brands are offering rewards for specified consumer actions such as Tweeting, or Liking. Adding novelty to the value exchange can prompt consumers to re-evaluate the brand in a or make their encounter more memorable.

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Insecticide Billboard Becomes Giant Bug Trap

Spring is in full bloom in Europe and summer is on the horizon, and with the hot weather comes short shorts and insect bites. Insecticide ads can be easy to miss in the clutter, but Italian brand Orphea cut through by turning a Milan billboard for its 4D product in to a massive sticky insect trap.

ORPHEA BILLBOARD

Initially, the billboard appeared to be just an image of the Orphea spray can, but as days passed bug after bug stuck to the billboard, in the shape of the spray emanating from the can. The trick? The advertisers applied transparent non-drying glue to the white paper, trapping the unfortunate bugs that landed on the board. The illusion that the insects are caught in the spray’s crosshairs is a clever way to promote the effectiveness of Orphea in open air situations.

Essentially, the billboard itself became one giant insect trap, making it effective as well as impactful. A brilliant way to promote the product and its purpose.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

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Beer Turnstile lets partygoers travel home free on Metro

Carnival in Rio is exuberant and outrageous. With two million people attending each day, Rio becomes a place where anything goes and alcohol flows. Drink-driving incidents increase by 50% during the period.

Carnival in Rio is exuberant and outrageous. With two million people attending each day, Rio becomes a place where anything goes and alcohol flows. Drink-driving incidents increase by 50% during the period.   To live up to their ‘Don’t Drink and Drive’ effort, Antarctica Beer decided to help carnivalgoers get home safely after drinking. To do this they created the ‘Beer Turnstile’ at metro stations which accepted (presumably empty) Antarctica beer cans as tickets.   All passengers had to do was scan the bar code on the beer can, and the turnstile unlocked. All the beer cans collected were then donated for recycling.  This effective campaign took advantage of a potentially dangerous behavior, and leveraged innovative technology to provide brand utility and promote safety.   The Beer Turnstile received an average of a thousand passengers an hour and the number of drunk drivers caught went down by 43%.

To live up to their ‘Don’t Drink and Drive’ effort, Antarctica Beer decided to help carnivalgoers get home safely after drinking. To do this they created the ‘Beer Turnstile’ at metro stations which accepted (presumably empty) Antarctica beer cans as tickets.

All passengers had to do was scan the bar code on the beer can, and the turnstile unlocked. All the beer cans collected were then donated for recycling.

This effective campaign took advantage of a potentially dangerous behavior, and leveraged innovative technology to provide brand utility and promote safety.

The Beer Turnstile received an average of a thousand passengers an hour and the number of drunk drivers caught went down by 43%.

BRAND UTILITY

Rather than just inter-rupting consumers’ lives, brands are increasingly looking to provide useful services or applications that give people something they actually need – without demanding an immediate return.

EVOLUTION OF SOCIAL

With the advent of always-on, ubiquitous internet access, and digitization, our actual and virtual lives are increasingly starting to blend into one.

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